UK to order more F35Bs in coming years

Ahead of the publication of the new Integrated Strategic Review, many rumors circulated about the arbitrations that will be led by the Johnson government, to redefine the format of the British armies. Among them was the hypothesis of a significant drop in orders for F35 aircraft of which Great Britain had committed to order 138 copies. For a long time, it was even a question of limit the fleet format of this device essential for the use of the two new Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers, with only 48 aircraft, the number of aircraft already ordered and being delivered.

The publication of the Integrated Strategic Review, a few days ago, however, did not remove the doubt on this question. Indeed, this gave pride of place to the Tempest program, as the main object of British public investment with no less than £ 2 billion per year, but no figure or even axis was disclosed when the number of F35s including would dispose of the Royal Air Force in the years to come, even though the Typhoon fleet saw 24 aircraft amputated, the first aircraft delivered about twenty years ago and whose design did not allow sufficient development. And the statements of Jeremy Quin, the minister in charge of defense acquisitions, before the House of Lords, if they open perspectives, do not give much more details. Indeed, according to the latter, Great Britain does indeed buy new F35Bs, the short take-off and landing version of Lockheed's aircraft, to complete its fleet of 48 aircraft currently being delivered. And to specify that this new order will take place by 2025. But to the question of the number of aircraft ordered, and the final fleet format, the British minister simply did not respond to British parliamentarians.

The F35B is today the only fixed-wing vertical or short take-off and landing aircraft that can be used on board Royal Navy aircraft carriers.

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